The Boy In The Striped Pajamas

2 05 2010

  The Boy In The Striped Pajamas tells us the story of Bruno and his family during World War II.  Bruno’s father, a soldier, has been promoted at the beginning to the film to head of a concentration camp.  The family moves into the countryside, about a mile or two from the camp, into a nice cottage full of Nazi soldiers.  With just his sister Gretel as a companion, Bruno spends one day wondering around, hoping to find clues of the strange farmers across the hill in the camp.  He winds his way through the woods until he comes to the fence and meets a little boy named Shmuel.  Every day after Bruno escapes into the woods and meets Shmuel at the fence where they will sit and talk for hours, two little boys who don’t know or understand the politics of war.  Then one day Bruno’s new friendship is discovered by one of the nastier soldiers at his home who tries to make him terrorize Shmuel.

  This film takes a hard look at the power of friendship and the innocence of children in the subjects that adults war about.  The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is a great film, [cinema-wise, not the Holocaust].  I first watched this film while on vacation in Washington, D.C. right after we had visited the Holocaust Museum.  I hadn’t heard anything about the film so I was caught off guard when it started in the midst of the Nazis.  A great movie worth watching, I would keep it away from your children until they’re in high school and better understand what actually happened in Europe during World War II.

Ellen

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